ISNUMBER function in Excel

Excel Tutorials for beginners, Intermediates and experts.

How to test a range for numbers in Excel

To test a range for numbers, you can use a formula based on the ISNUMBER and SUMPRODUCT functions. See example below: Formula =SUMPRODUCT(–ISNUMBER(range))>0 Explanation In the example shown, the formula in xxxx is: =SUMPRODUCT(–ISNUMBER(C5:C9))>0 How this formula works Working from the inside out, the ISNUMBER function will return TRUE when given a number and FALSE if… read more »

Split numbers from units of measure in Excel

To split a number from a unit value, you need to determine the position of the last number. If you add 1 to that position, you have the start of the unit text. Note: these is an experimental formula that uses a hard coded array constant, set down here for reference and comment. Casually tested… read more »

How to check cell that contains specific text in Excel

To check if a cell contains specific text, you can use the SEARCH function together with the ISNUMBER function. In the generic version, substring is the specific text you are looking for, and text represents text in the cell you are testing. Formula =ISNUMBER(SEARCH(substring,text)) Explanation  In the example shown, the formula in D5 is: =ISNUMBER(SEARCH(C5,B5)) This formula returns TRUE if… read more »

How to check cell that contains one of many with exclusions in Excel

To test a cell for one of many strings, while excluding others, you can use a formula based on the SEARCH, ISNUMBER, and SUMPRODUCT functions. Formula =(SUMPRODUCT(–ISNUMBER(SEARCH(include,A1)))>0) *(SUMPRODUCT(–ISNUMBER(SEARCH(exclude,A1)))=0) Note: this formula returns either 1 or zero, which are handled like TRUE and FALSE in formulas, conditional formatting, or data validation. Explanation In the example shown the… read more »

How to check if cell contains number in Excel

To test if a cell (or any text string) contains a number, you can use the FIND function together with the COUNT function. In the generic form of the formula (above), A1 represents the cell you are testing. The numbers to be checked (numbers between 0-9) are supplied as an array. Formula =COUNT(FIND({0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9},A1))>0 Explanation In… read more »

How to check if cell contains one of many things in Excel

This tutorial shows how to check if cell contains one of many things in Excel using example below: If you want to test a cell to see if it contains one of several things, you can do so with a formula that uses the SEARCH function, with help from the ISNUMBER and SUMPRODUCT functions. Formula =SUMPRODUCT(–ISNUMBER(SEARCH(things,A1)))>0… read more »

How to check if cell contains all of many things in Excel

If you want to test a cell to see if it contains all items in a list, you can do so with a formula that uses the SEARCH function, with help from the ISNUMBER, SUMPRODUCT, and COUNTA functions. Case study: Let’s say you have a list of text strings in the range B5:B8, and you want… read more »

How to abbreviate names or words in Excel

To abbreviate text that contains capital letters, you can try this array formula based on the TEXTJOIN function, which is new in Excel 2016. You can use this approach to create initials from names, or to create acronyms. Only capital letters will survive this formula, so the source text must include capitalized words. You can… read more »

How to check cell contains which things in Excel

If you have a list of things (words, substrings, etc) and want to find out which of these things appear in a cell, you can build a simple table and use a formula based on the SEARCH function. Setup Suppose you have a cells that contain text that mentions various colors, and you want to… read more »

How to count keywords in a range of cell

To count the number of specific words or keywords that appear in a given cell, you can use a formula based on the SEARCH, ISNUMBER, and SUMPRODUCT functions.  Formula =SUMPRODUCT(–ISNUMBER(SEARCH(keywords,A1))) Note: if a keyword appears more than once in a given cell, it will only be counted once. In other words, the formula only counts… read more »

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