TRUE function in Excel

Excel Math & Trig functions perform many of the common mathematical calculations, including basic arithmetic, conditional sums & products, exponents & logarithms, and the trigonometric ratios.

How to return TRUE when all cells in range are blank in Excel

To return TRUE when all cells in a range are blank or empty, you can use a formula based on SUMPRODUCT and a logical test that suits the use case. Formula =SUMPRODUCT(–(range<>””))=0 Explanation In the example shown, the formula in E5 is: =SUMPRODUCT(–(B5:D5<>””))=0 How this formula works Working from the inside out, this formula contains… read more »

How to retrieve first match between two ranges in Excel

To retrieve the first match in two ranges of values, you can use a formula based on the INDEX, MATCH, and COUNTIF functions. Formula =INDEX(range2,MATCH(TRUE,COUNTIF(range1,range2)>0,0)) Explanation In the example shown, the formula in G5 is: =INDEX(range2,MATCH(TRUE,COUNTIF(range1,range2)>0,0)) where “range1” is the named range B5:B8, “range2” is the named range D5:D7. How this formula works In this example the named range… read more »

How to strip non-numeric characters in Excel

To remove non-numeric characters from a text string, you can try this experimental formula based on the TEXTJOIN function, new in Excel 2016. Formula {=TEXTJOIN(“”,TRUE,IFERROR(MID(A1,ROW(INDIRECT(“1:100″)),1)+0,””))} Note: TEXTJOIN will return the numbers as text, for example “100,”500″, etc. If you want a true numeric result, add zero, or wrap the entire formula in the VALUE function. TEXTJOIN was added in… read more »

How to strip numeric characters from cell in Excel

To remove numeric characters from a text string, you can try this experimental formula based on the TEXTJOIN function, new in Excel 2016. Formula {=TEXTJOIN(“”,TRUE,IF(ISERR(MID(A1,ROW(INDIRECT(“1:100”)),1)+0), MID(A1,ROW(INDIRECT(“1:100″)),1),””))} Explanation In the example shown, the formula in C5 is: =TEXTJOIN(“”,TRUE,IF(ISERR(MID(B5,ROW(INDIRECT(“1:100”)),1)+0), MID(B5,ROW(INDIRECT(“1:100″)),1),””)) Note: this is an array formula and must be entered with control + shift + enter. How… read more »

Match first error in Excel

This tutorial shows how to Match first error in Excel using the example below; Formula {=MATCH(TRUE,ISERROR(range),0)} Explanation If you need to match the first error in a range of cells, you can use an array formula based on the MATCH and ISERROR functions. In the example shown, the formula is: {=MATCH(TRUE,ISERROR(B4:B11),0)} This is an array… read more »

Get first match cell contains in Excel

This tutorial shows how to Get first match cell contains in Excel using the example below; Formula {=INDEX(things,MATCH(TRUE,ISNUMBER(SEARCH(things,A1)),0))} Explanation To check a cell for one of several things, and return the first match found in the list, you can use an INDEX / MATCH formula that uses SEARCH or FIND to locate a match. This… read more »

Exact match lookup with INDEX and MATCH in Excel

This tutorial shows how to Exact match lookup with INDEX and MATCH in Excel using the example below; Formula {=INDEX(data,MATCH(TRUE,EXACT(val,lookup_col),0),col_num)} Explanation Case-sensitive lookup By default, standard lookups with VLOOKUP or INDEX + MATCH aren’t case-sensitive. Both VLOOKUP and MATCH will simply return the first match, ignoring case. However, if you need to do a case-sensitive… read more »

How to use Excel TRUE Function

This Excel tutorial explains how to use the TRUE function with syntax and examples. Excel TRUE Function Description The Excel True function returns the logical value TRUE. The function takes no arguments and therefore, the syntax is simply: TRUE() Note that you can also get the same result by simply typing the text ‘True’ into… read more »

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